August 2009

II Luscri

II ("Two") joined the Skandalaris Center for Entrepreneurial Studies at Washington University in 2007 as Student Services Coordinator. His responsibilities include managing the center's on-campus presence and outreach to students, faculty, and staff through both curricular and co-curricular programs. Key initiatives rolled out during his tenure include the Skandalaris Summer Internship Program (places WU undergraduates in internships with local entrepreneurs for a subsidized rate), IDEA: Innovation-Discovery-Experience-Action (a pre-orientation program for incoming freshmen), the Certificate of Accomplishment in Entrepreneurship, and a new Minor in Entrepreneurship. Since 2007, the entrepreneurship curriculum across the university has grown from 33 to 51 courses with more than 1 in 10 Washington University students enrolling in entrepreneurship classes each academic year. Prior to his employment in academia, II worked in various government and political offices. As an undergraduate at Webster University, he cultivated his entrepreneurial spirit by opening an on-campus coffee house and creating a closed-circuit television station. He earned a BA in Political Science and BS in Mathematics from Webster, an MPA from Saint Louis University, and is a PhD Candidate at the University of Missouri-St. Louis.

Wayne Chung

Wayne C. Chung is an Associate Professor in the School of Design's Industrial Design Program at Carnegie Mellon. He is interested in design research methods for collaboration and innovation, and his academic work investigates processes for managing design decisions through technology applications and applying people-centered research methods for appropriate solutions. Chung has worked and collaborated with a range of clients, industry sponsors, and partners, including Intel Digital Health, Apple Computer, Texas Instruments, Whirlpool Corporation and more. Prior to teaching at Carnegie Mellon, Chung taught in the Department of Industrial, Interior and Visual Communication Design at The Ohio State University and served as the interim director of the Industrial Design Program at Georgia Institute of Technology. Chung holds a BFA with Honors in Industrial Design, with a minor in Business Management from Carnegie Mellon University, and a Masters of Industrial Design from the University of the Arts.

Khanjan Mehta

Khanjan Mehta is a Senior Research Associate in the College of Engineering at The Pennsylvania State University. His professional interests include innovative system integration, high-tech entrepreneurship and international social entrepreneurship. Khanjan loves connecting concepts, people, computers and devices. A basic philosophy behind his work is the convergence of disciplines, concepts, cultures, and countries to create a freer, friendlier, fairer and more sustainable planet. He has led social entrepreneurship ventures in Kenya, China, and Tanzania. In his spare time, he loves traveling, photography, cooking and adventure sports.

 

Khanjan Mehta has applied for and been awarded 4 grants

  • From Research Lab to Product: Lab Automation Course to Enable Rapid Product Development

    Began May, 2006 and ended May, 2008

    This proposal focuses on the development of a hands-on course that will equip E-Teams to rapidly and effectively take ideas from a concept to a product. The course focuses on computer-based instrumentation, control and lab automation techniques. It will enable students to rapidly prototype systems using commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) components by helping them develop critical thinking and testing regimens required to stimulate migrating research ideas into products and the marketplace. The ultimate objective of this course is to foster innovation, intrapreneurship and entrepreneurship by providing students the tools and knowledge to quickly assemble proof-of-concept systems leading to new products. Students from various departments in engineering, science, and humanities who are developing product ideas, work in a research lab, or are actively involved in professional project-oriented clubs are expected to enroll. The course will encompass essential engineering concepts, to include the following: using virtual instrumentation, integrating sensor networks, collecting/processing signals, defining system response, and controlling actuators. Concepts will focus on solving real-world systems problems, demonstrating product evolutionary steps of concept, research, design, and production. E-teams of 3-4 students will form and identify an intrapreneurial or entrepreneurial design project, e.g., research in labs, product ideas that have their genesis in their projects, or automated test systems that accelerate the internationalization of products by ensuring the localized/tropicalized prototypes meet design constraints and performance requirements. The E-team mentors will be faculty members from the student's disciplines and will provide their expertise in the area-specific knowledge; the course instructor will provide support addressing implementation issues.

    With the team:

    • Dr. David Wormley Dean of Engineering, College of Engineering, Pennsylvania State University-Main Campus
    • Dr. Robert Killoren Associate Vice President for Research and Director of Sponsored Programs, Office of Sponsored Programs, Pennsylvania State University-Main Campus
    • Khanjan Mehta
    • Mr. William Burkhard Director, Electronics and Computer Services, Pennsylvania State University-Main Campus
  • Mashavu: Networked Health Solutions for the Developing World

    Began October, 2008 and ended October, 2009

    There is one doctor for every 50,000 people in East Africa compared to one doctor for every 390 people in the United States. It costs a significant amount of time and money to consult a doctor and whether to even consult a doctor is a critical decision. U.S. doctors are interested in performing outreach but cannot make commitments to long-term international assignments. Mashavu enables medical professionals around the world to connect with patients in the developing world using modern technology and communications infrastructure. Trained operators at Mashavu stations in developing communities collect essential medical information including weight, body temperature, lung capacity, blood pressure, photographs, stethoscope rhythms, and basic hygiene and nutrition information for each patient on a regular basis. Web servers aggregate this information from various Mashavu stations over a cell-phone link and provide it on a web-based portal. Medical professionals can view the patient’s information and respond to the patient and the nearest doctor(s) with their recommendations. Validation efforts prove that numerous entities are willing to purchase Mashavu stations. They can charge customers a small fee, thereby making Mashavu economically sustainable and creating an additional revenue stream. We propose to: 1. Design, prototype and test inexpensive computer-based biomedical devices (Mashavu station) and the networked system (Mashavu network). 2. Perform preliminary on-the-ground testing of the Mashavu stations, Mashavu network and the business plan. 3. Implement the system in a top-down manner (UNIDO, CYEC) and bottom-up manner (NIMR, grassroots) and craft the final scale-up strategy based on lessons learned.

    With the team:

    • Dr. David Richardson Office of Sponsored Programs, Pennsylvania State University-Main Campus
    • Khanjan Mehta
    • Mr. William Burkhard Director, Electronic and Computer Services, Pennsylvania State University-Main Campus
    • Dr. Peter Butler Associate Professor, Bioengineering, Pennsylvania State University-Main Campus
    • Dr. Newton Defaria Business Development Manager, Life and Analytical Sciences,
    • Mr. Paul Maina Kinguru Director, Child and Youth Empowerment Center,
    • Mr. Alexander Varghese UNIDO Representative for Kenya and Eritrea,
    • Dr. Thomas Colledge Assistant Professor, Engineering Design, Pennsylvania State University-Main Campus
    • Mr. Gregory Pierce Instructor, Director - Honors Core Program, Smeal Business School, Pennsylvania State University-Main Campus
    • Dr. Hamisi Malebo Senior Research Scientist and Head, Department of Traditional Medicine Research,
    • Dr. Josiah Tayali Head Doctor + Chairman of the Havilla Ophanage Village Board, Outreach Clinic,
    • Ms. Priya Almeida Program Manager - Engineering,
  • Mashavu: Networked Health Solutions for the Developing World

    Began December, 1969 and ended December, 1969

    There is one doctor for every 50,000 people in East Africa compared to one doctor for every 390 people in the United States. It costs a significant amount of time and money to consult a doctor and whether to even consult a doctor is a critical decision. U.S. doctors are interested in performing outreach but cannot make commitments to long-term international assignments. Mashavu enables medical professionals around the world to connect with patients in the developing world using modern technology and communications infrastructure. Trained operators at Mashavu stations in developing communities collect essential medical information including weight, body temperature, lung capacity, blood pressure, photographs, stethoscope rhythms, and basic hygiene and nutrition information for each patient on a regular basis. Web servers aggregate this information from various Mashavu stations over a cell-phone link and provide it on a web-based portal. Medical professionals can view the patient’s information and respond to the patient and the nearest doctor(s) with their recommendations. Validation efforts prove that numerous entities are willing to purchase Mashavu stations. They can charge customers a small fee, thereby making Mashavu economically sustainable and creating an additional revenue stream. We propose to: 1. Design, prototype and test inexpensive computer-based biomedical devices (Mashavu station) and the networked system (Mashavu network). 2. Perform preliminary on-the-ground testing of the Mashavu stations, Mashavu network and the business plan. 3. Implement the system in a top-down manner (UNIDO, CYEC) and bottom-up manner (NIMR, grassroots) and craft the final scale-up strategy based on lessons learned.

    With the team:

    • Khanjan Mehta
  • Social Entrepreneurship Course Development Planning Grant

    Began March, 2010 and ended December, 2010

    The Humanitarian Engineering and Social Entrepreneurship (HESE) program at Penn State is leading several international technology-based social ventures including infrastructure, telemedicine, cellphone-based social networking, and developing a three-year degree program to train entrepreneurial secondary school science teachers. Business planning for ongoing ventures is typically performed in a finance class focusing on US-based for-profit ventures and does not cater to the different challenges and dynamics encountered on social entrepreneurial endeavors. We propose to fill this critical need by developing a course dedicated to business planning for social ventures in the US and abroad. This course will eventually enable the expansion of the Certificate in Engineering and Community Engagement into a minor in HESE. Penn State offers a minor in engineering entrepreneurship with students participating in a capstone entrepreneurship class. A complementary capstone experience in social entrepreneurship will enrich the program and meet growing student demand. The proposed course will cover the fundamental concepts of social entrepreneurship and employ diverse case studies and experiential learning activities to help students develop a deeper understanding of social problems and devise innovative enterprise solutions to address them. Proposal Objectives: 1. Research experiential social entrepreneurship course curricula and models at US universities. 2. Develop the curriculum and model for the course at Penn State that will meet the needs of the various programs and multiple colleges. 3. Develop partnerships with local and foreign organizations to facilitate the experiential course component: students working in an E-team environment to develop feasibility reports and pitches for REAL social ventures.

    With the team:

    • Dr. David Wormley Dean, Pennsylvania State University-Main Campus
    • Khanjan Mehta
    • Dr. William Burkhard Director, ECS, Pennsylvania State University-Main Campus
    • Dr. Christine Wilson Associate Coordinator, Grants & Contracts, College of Engineering, Pennsylvania State University-Main Campus

Giles Hertz

Giles T. Hertz is an Assistant Professor of Management and Entrepreneurship in the Haile College of Business at Northern Kentucky University. He is a 1983 graduate of the University of Kentucky (BA, Political Science) and a 1989 Graduate of the Salmon P. Chase College of Law at Northern Kentucky University (JD). Professor Hertz teaches both undergraduate- and graduate-level classes. He received the Dean's Citation for Outstanding Teaching in 2003, the NKU Alumni Association's Most Influential Award in 2008, and the Sandy Easton Outstanding Faculty Member in the College of Business Award in 2009. Professor Hertz' research interests include new venture financing, entrepreneurship education, legal issues associated with the new venture process, and risk mitigation in higher education.

Rebecca White

Rebecca J. White is the James W. Walter Distinguished Chair of Entrepreneurship and Director of the Florida Entrepreneurship Center at the University of Tampa. She received an MBA and PhD from Virginia Tech University and a BS from Concord University. Dr. White is the founder of several programs and companies, including the Fifth Third Bank Entrepreneurship Institute at Northern Kentucky University, the Women's Entrepreneurship Institute with the New York Times, RiskAware, LLC and adEsse, LLC. Dr. White was a 2006 Athena® Award finalist, 2005 Freedoms Foundation Leavey Award recipient and 2003 Ernst and Young Entrepreneur of the Year award winner. Under Dr. White's leadership, the NKU program was named one of the top twenty-five in the country by Princeton Review and Entrepreneur Magazine, one of the Top fifty MBA programs by Women 3.0, and won awards for excellence and innovation from the Global Consortium of Entrepreneurship Centers and AACSB.

Michael Harris

Michael Harris is Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs at Kettering. He specializes in public policy and political economy, and has published three books, including Entrepreneurs and Innovation in State and Local Government (edited with Rhonda Kinney). His fourth book, Leading the Learner-Centered Campus (2009) [co-authored with R, Cullen] is forthcoming. Dr. Harris is a consultant-evaluator for the North Central Association and a certified appraiser for the Academic Quality Improvement Program. He received his PhD in public policy from Indiana University, his master's degree from Tel-Aviv University, and his undergraduate degree from Bar-Ilan University.

Massoud Tavakoli

Massoud Tavakoli is Professor of Mechanical Engineering at Kettering University. His expertise is in the area of product design, liability and failure analysis, with a focused interest in vehicle collision dynamics and occupant protection. Dr. Tavakoli has an active applied research program, has testified as a technical expert witness, and is a licensed professional engineer. Dr. Tavakoli is Kettering's Coordinator for Entrepreneurship & Innovation, responsible for implementing a comprehensive vision for integration of an entrepreneurial mindset across curricular and non-curricular functions of Kettering. He is the founder of the Kettering Entrepreneur Society, where multiple student businesses have been initiated.

Timothy Kriewall

Timothy J. Kriewall has been a Program Director at the Kern Family Foundation since July, 2008. In this role, he leads the Kern Entrepreneurship Education Network (KEEN) program. He also works closely with other foundation senior staff in program planning, development, and strategy implementation. This KEEN collaboration includes identifying and analyzing opportunities to advance the Foundation's mission to enhance engineering entrepreneurial education to instill the tools and philosophies of free enterprise for the preservation of American economic leadership in the world. Dr. Kriewall served as President of Wisconsin Lutheran College in Milwaukee, a position he held since 2003. He began his career at Bell Telephone Laboratories, and has served in various capacities at 3M and Medtronic corporations, focusing on the invention and commercialization of innovative medical devices, including cochlear implants and state-of-the-art perfusion systems. Dr. Kriewall also served as a professor in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the University of Michigan Medical School for eight years, earning the rank of Associate Professor.

Philip Doepker

Philip E. Doepker is a Professor of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Dayton and the Director of the Innovation Center in the School of Engineering. He teaches capstone design courses that include multidisciplinary design, innovation and project management. Most recently, as a PI for a KEEN Grant, he has been instrumental in developing partnerships with the School of Business Administration (entrepreneurship program) and the School of Law (intellectual property) to expand the mindset of engineers to include innovation and entrepreneurship. Prior to joining the University in 1984, he was an engineer and manager at Babcock and Wilcox Research. He is a Fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) and has served in various capacities in the Design Engineering Division (DED) and recently as chair of the division.

Christopher King

Christopher C. King serves as the Director of the Center for Environmental Education and Training and the Midwest OSHA Education Center at Saint Louis University School of Public Health. During his twenty-six years in environmental health and safety training he has worked in a variety of areas, including water quality research, water and wastewater operations, hazardous materials management, lead hazards and occupational safety and health. Throughout his career he has been vested in the process of assisting underserved communities to develop capacity for addressing their environmental health and safety issues, and he has worked with domestic and international communities toward this end.