Khanjan Mehta

Khanjan Mehta is a Senior Research Associate in the College of Engineering at The Pennsylvania State University. His professional interests include innovative system integration, high-tech entrepreneurship and international social entrepreneurship. Khanjan loves connecting concepts, people, computers and devices. A basic philosophy behind his work is the convergence of disciplines, concepts, cultures, and countries to create a freer, friendlier, fairer and more sustainable planet. He has led social entrepreneurship ventures in Kenya, China, and Tanzania. In his spare time, he loves traveling, photography, cooking and adventure sports.

 

Khanjan Mehta has applied for and been awarded 4 grants

  • From Research Lab to Product: Lab Automation Course to Enable Rapid Product Development

    Began May, 2006 and ended May, 2008

    This proposal focuses on the development of a hands-on course that will equip E-Teams to rapidly and effectively take ideas from a concept to a product. The course focuses on computer-based instrumentation, control and lab automation techniques. It will enable students to rapidly prototype systems using commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) components by helping them develop critical thinking and testing regimens required to stimulate migrating research ideas into products and the marketplace. The ultimate objective of this course is to foster innovation, intrapreneurship and entrepreneurship by providing students the tools and knowledge to quickly assemble proof-of-concept systems leading to new products. Students from various departments in engineering, science, and humanities who are developing product ideas, work in a research lab, or are actively involved in professional project-oriented clubs are expected to enroll. The course will encompass essential engineering concepts, to include the following: using virtual instrumentation, integrating sensor networks, collecting/processing signals, defining system response, and controlling actuators. Concepts will focus on solving real-world systems problems, demonstrating product evolutionary steps of concept, research, design, and production. E-teams of 3-4 students will form and identify an intrapreneurial or entrepreneurial design project, e.g., research in labs, product ideas that have their genesis in their projects, or automated test systems that accelerate the internationalization of products by ensuring the localized/tropicalized prototypes meet design constraints and performance requirements. The E-team mentors will be faculty members from the student's disciplines and will provide their expertise in the area-specific knowledge; the course instructor will provide support addressing implementation issues.

    With the team:

    • Dr. David Wormley Dean of Engineering, College of Engineering, Pennsylvania State University-Main Campus
    • Dr. Robert Killoren Associate Vice President for Research and Director of Sponsored Programs, Office of Sponsored Programs, Pennsylvania State University-Main Campus
    • Khanjan Mehta
    • Mr. William Burkhard Director, Electronics and Computer Services, Pennsylvania State University-Main Campus
  • Mashavu: Networked Health Solutions for the Developing World

    Began October, 2008 and ended October, 2009

    There is one doctor for every 50,000 people in East Africa compared to one doctor for every 390 people in the United States. It costs a significant amount of time and money to consult a doctor and whether to even consult a doctor is a critical decision. U.S. doctors are interested in performing outreach but cannot make commitments to long-term international assignments. Mashavu enables medical professionals around the world to connect with patients in the developing world using modern technology and communications infrastructure. Trained operators at Mashavu stations in developing communities collect essential medical information including weight, body temperature, lung capacity, blood pressure, photographs, stethoscope rhythms, and basic hygiene and nutrition information for each patient on a regular basis. Web servers aggregate this information from various Mashavu stations over a cell-phone link and provide it on a web-based portal. Medical professionals can view the patient’s information and respond to the patient and the nearest doctor(s) with their recommendations. Validation efforts prove that numerous entities are willing to purchase Mashavu stations. They can charge customers a small fee, thereby making Mashavu economically sustainable and creating an additional revenue stream. We propose to: 1. Design, prototype and test inexpensive computer-based biomedical devices (Mashavu station) and the networked system (Mashavu network). 2. Perform preliminary on-the-ground testing of the Mashavu stations, Mashavu network and the business plan. 3. Implement the system in a top-down manner (UNIDO, CYEC) and bottom-up manner (NIMR, grassroots) and craft the final scale-up strategy based on lessons learned.

    With the team:

    • Dr. David Richardson Office of Sponsored Programs, Pennsylvania State University-Main Campus
    • Khanjan Mehta
    • Mr. William Burkhard Director, Electronic and Computer Services, Pennsylvania State University-Main Campus
    • Dr. Peter Butler Associate Professor, Bioengineering, Pennsylvania State University-Main Campus
    • Dr. Newton Defaria Business Development Manager, Life and Analytical Sciences,
    • Mr. Paul Maina Kinguru Director, Child and Youth Empowerment Center,
    • Mr. Alexander Varghese UNIDO Representative for Kenya and Eritrea,
    • Dr. Thomas Colledge Assistant Professor, Engineering Design, Pennsylvania State University-Main Campus
    • Mr. Gregory Pierce Instructor, Director - Honors Core Program, Smeal Business School, Pennsylvania State University-Main Campus
    • Dr. Hamisi Malebo Senior Research Scientist and Head, Department of Traditional Medicine Research,
    • Dr. Josiah Tayali Head Doctor + Chairman of the Havilla Ophanage Village Board, Outreach Clinic,
    • Ms. Priya Almeida Program Manager - Engineering,
  • Mashavu: Networked Health Solutions for the Developing World

    Began December, 1969 and ended December, 1969

    There is one doctor for every 50,000 people in East Africa compared to one doctor for every 390 people in the United States. It costs a significant amount of time and money to consult a doctor and whether to even consult a doctor is a critical decision. U.S. doctors are interested in performing outreach but cannot make commitments to long-term international assignments. Mashavu enables medical professionals around the world to connect with patients in the developing world using modern technology and communications infrastructure. Trained operators at Mashavu stations in developing communities collect essential medical information including weight, body temperature, lung capacity, blood pressure, photographs, stethoscope rhythms, and basic hygiene and nutrition information for each patient on a regular basis. Web servers aggregate this information from various Mashavu stations over a cell-phone link and provide it on a web-based portal. Medical professionals can view the patient’s information and respond to the patient and the nearest doctor(s) with their recommendations. Validation efforts prove that numerous entities are willing to purchase Mashavu stations. They can charge customers a small fee, thereby making Mashavu economically sustainable and creating an additional revenue stream. We propose to: 1. Design, prototype and test inexpensive computer-based biomedical devices (Mashavu station) and the networked system (Mashavu network). 2. Perform preliminary on-the-ground testing of the Mashavu stations, Mashavu network and the business plan. 3. Implement the system in a top-down manner (UNIDO, CYEC) and bottom-up manner (NIMR, grassroots) and craft the final scale-up strategy based on lessons learned.

    With the team:

    • Khanjan Mehta
  • Social Entrepreneurship Course Development Planning Grant

    Began March, 2010 and ended December, 2010

    The Humanitarian Engineering and Social Entrepreneurship (HESE) program at Penn State is leading several international technology-based social ventures including infrastructure, telemedicine, cellphone-based social networking, and developing a three-year degree program to train entrepreneurial secondary school science teachers. Business planning for ongoing ventures is typically performed in a finance class focusing on US-based for-profit ventures and does not cater to the different challenges and dynamics encountered on social entrepreneurial endeavors. We propose to fill this critical need by developing a course dedicated to business planning for social ventures in the US and abroad. This course will eventually enable the expansion of the Certificate in Engineering and Community Engagement into a minor in HESE. Penn State offers a minor in engineering entrepreneurship with students participating in a capstone entrepreneurship class. A complementary capstone experience in social entrepreneurship will enrich the program and meet growing student demand. The proposed course will cover the fundamental concepts of social entrepreneurship and employ diverse case studies and experiential learning activities to help students develop a deeper understanding of social problems and devise innovative enterprise solutions to address them. Proposal Objectives: 1. Research experiential social entrepreneurship course curricula and models at US universities. 2. Develop the curriculum and model for the course at Penn State that will meet the needs of the various programs and multiple colleges. 3. Develop partnerships with local and foreign organizations to facilitate the experiential course component: students working in an E-team environment to develop feasibility reports and pitches for REAL social ventures.

    With the team:

    • Dr. David Wormley Dean, Pennsylvania State University-Main Campus
    • Khanjan Mehta
    • Dr. William Burkhard Director, ECS, Pennsylvania State University-Main Campus
    • Dr. Christine Wilson Associate Coordinator, Grants & Contracts, College of Engineering, Pennsylvania State University-Main Campus