rowan university

Ski Lift Footrest Retrofit

Rowan University, 2001 - $8,375

In the increasingly popular sport of snowboarding, innovations in board and accessory design are constantly appearing on the market. Designs in chair lifts, however, have not mirrored this trend. As a result, current chair lifts cater mostly to skiers, making them very difficult and unsafe for a snowboarder to use. In response to this, the SnoRhino E-Team developed a new chair lift footrest, called the SnoRhino, that makes the chair ride comfortable for both skiers and snowboarders while solving the problems of safety and comfort for the boarders.

After forming a company called Uphill Enterprises, Inc., the E-Team recently tested their first designs at the Montage Ski Resort, where the product met with excellent feedback from snowboarders.

Enhanced Machine Head Design

Rowan University, 2001 - $10,830

When handling a stringed instrument such as a guitar or violin, unwanted jarring of the instrument's tuning knobs can occur. Slightly bumping an instrument's headstock (top of the instrument) while moving about or leaning an instrument against a wall or a floor during break periods can lead to the detuning of the instrument's strings.

With Clutch Knobs in place, this detuning cannot occur. If accidentally bumped, the knobs spin freely without altering the string tension. To tune the guitar, the musician turns the knobs as usual.

Social and Sustainable Entrepreneurship

Rowan University, 2008 - $6,000

This project supports the design and development of new social and sustainable entrepreneurship concepts and modules for two existing courses at Rowan University. The primary outcomes will be to academically prepare students to compete for fellowships and internships in social and sustainable entrepreneurship projects and to create E-Teams. Rowan faculty will pair Rowan students with students from nearby Philadelphia-area universities. New concepts and modules include global economic development history and policy; economic, environmental, and social data analysis; international case studies; microfinance concepts and practices; and global measurements for development projects.

Ski Lift Footrest - SnoRhino

Rowan University, 2002 - $8,375

In the increasingly popular sport of snowboarding, innovations in board and accessory design are constantly appearing on the market. Designs in chair lifts, however, have not mirrored this trend. As a result, current chair lifts cater mostly to skiers, making them very difficult and unsafe for a snowboarder to use. In response to this, the SnoRhino E-Team has developed a new chair lift footrest, called the SnoRhino, that makes the chair ride comfortable for both skiers and snowboarders while solving the problems of safety and comfort for the boarders. After forming a company called Uphill Enterprises, Inc., the E-Team recently tested their first designs at the Montage Ski Resort, where the product met with excellent feedback from snowboarders.

ChemoTemp

Rowan University, 2002 - $14,750

An adverse effect of chemotherapy is that it lowers patients' white and red blood cell production as it attacks their rapidly dividing cancer cells. Progressive reduction in red blood cell counts leads to anemia, while reduction in white blood cells leaves them susceptible to infection. In the event of infection, mortality rates for chemotherapy patients can reach as high as 70% if not promptly treated with antibiotics. Thus, quick detection of infection is critical to maintaining chemotherapy patients' health. Because fever is an indicator of infection, chemotherapy patients and their caretakers must monitor patients' temperatures to ensure patient health. When fever is detected, patients require prompt medical attention.

The ChemoTemp E-Team developed a fever monitoring and reporting device for chemotherapy patients. The device accurately measures patient temperature, identifies fever and risk of fever, and reports fever conditions to the patient and/or caregiver. Patients can wear ChemoTemp comfortably for long periods of time.

The team consisted of twenty-three undergraduate students from the Junior/Senior Engineering Clinic course, including students from electrical and computer engineering, mechanical engineering, and life sciences students. These students worked with a team of twelve graduate students and the clinic course professor.

The Helping Hand

Rowan University, 2004 - $14,395

This E-Team developed The Helping Hand, a holding device for writing instruments designed for individuals with limited hand function. The device consists of an ergonomically designed, ambidextrous top shape that lets the hand rest in its natural position, a clasp for the writing instrument, and a base plate with roller bearings. The device naturally sits in the "up" position, and, through the use of a light spring, is pushed down by the weight of the person's hand when writing. The person uses forearm and shoulder movements to write, and when ready to move to another spot on the paper, simply lifts up the arm and rolls the device across the paper.

A Venture Capital Fund to Encourage Rapid Product Development in the Junior and Senior Clinic

University of Wisconsin-Whitewater - $30000.00

A renewal and extension of Rowan University funded Junior Engineering Clinic I and Junior Engineering Clinic II, this program supports a joint Rowan/NCIIA Venture Capital Fund. The Venture Capital Fund provides the opportunity for multidisciplinary E-Teams to propose, plan, and implement an original, semester-long product development enterprise. Student E-Teams involved in the program create a corporate structure to develop a prototype and write a business plan in one semester. Teams must form early, have an original idea, and be interdisciplinary in order to receive funding. Teams who do not receive NCIIA funding in the course join other teams or work with an industry or faculty sponsored project

Junior Engineering Clinic I

Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art - $10000.00

In this project, Rowan University's Engineering Clinic incorporated an E-Team structure, enhancing the existing entrepreneurial focus of the Clinic. NCIIA funds were used for E-Team prototypes and product development in the junior and senior phases of the Clinic's four-year course sequence. Throughout the sequence, courses are team-based and focused on design and development of products. Innovation is stressed and students are encouraged to create new technologies.
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