university of miami

Breast Augmentation Instrument - BME 590 Technical Entrepreneurship

University of Miami, 2001 - $9,800

This E-Team designed an instrument that eases the insertion of implants when using the transaxillary breast augmentation procedure. The device works by holding the implant in an upright position. The first prototype was made out of stainless steel. Eventually, the team planned to test that prototype in surgery and, depending on the results, take it to mass production.

Technical Entrepreneurship Portable Insulin Cooler

University of Miami, 2000 - $6,500

This grant supported the development of a prototype for a small, portable, battery-powered cooler for transporting heat- and cold-sensitive materials such as insulin for periods greater than forty-eight hours. The device was designed to be cost competitive with existing coolers using cooler packs, and offer greater temperature control, longer storage, and additional features, such as a syringe and blood sugar measuring equipment compartment. The market projected to be 50-100k units based on diabetic usage in the US. The E-Team was composed of five biomedical engineering students and faculty advisors from the department. The team worked with two companies that manufacture the key components of the device, a thermoelectric cooling system and moldable paraffin insulation.

Arthroscopic Simulator

University of Miami, 2000 - $13,500

This E-Team developed a mechanical device that allows surgeons to practice various arthroscopic techniques on the knee, in order to develop better techniques and muscle memory. The device incorporates feedback mechanisms to allow for performance monitoring. It is portable, affordable, and easy to use.

Expansion of Our Technical Entrepreneurship Program

University of Miami, 2006 - $6,500

With support from a NCIIA course and program grant the University of Miami first offered Technical Entrepreneurship (TE) in the Department of Biomedical Engineering in 1999. NCIIA then awarded a second grant to continue the course, expanding it to other engineering students and offering it as an alternative to the mandatory Senior Design Project course. To date, more than 100 students have completed the TE sequence with good results, and several E-Teams have been awarded grants. One project led to a patent application, and many others have led to invention disclosures.

This grant allows for further expansion of the course, revising it to meet important new goals. New aspects include the following: 1) Transforming TE into a truly interdisciplinary course, including students from other disciplines by adding faculty and other partners. 2) Collaborating with the School of Business Administration to include business students in E-Teams for SBA credits. 3) Establishing a dedicated design and prototyping studio to replace the lab that was destroyed in a fire. 4) Restructuring the lecture series to improve student selection of projects, searches for existing work, budgeting and discussions on the design process, prototyping, testing, documentation, and the legal and business aspects of entrepreneurship. 5) Create structures for sustaining promising E-Team projects beyond graduation. Some of the TE course renovations may be transferable to NCIIA-funded courses at other institutions.

Technical Entrepreneurship Program: Continued Support

University of Miami, 2008 - $13,847

This grant offers continued support for the Technical Entrepreneurship Program at the University of Miami. A 1999 NCIIA Course & Program grant resulted in the first offering of Technical Entrepreneurship (TE) in the Department of Biomedical Engineering. NCIIA then awarded a second grant to continue the course, expanding it to other engineering students and offering it as an alternative to the mandatory Senior Design Project course. To date, well over 100 students have completed the TE sequence with good results, and several E-Teams have been awarded grants. One project led to a patent application, and many others have led to invention disclosures.

Chest Protector

University of Miami, 2004 - $11,095

This E-Team developed an enhanced chest protector aimed at little league baseball players. More than any other sport, baseball players are susceptible to sudden cardiac death (SCD) as a result of a baseball hitting the child’s chest, particularly the silhouette of the heart located in the upper-left quadrant. The team built a chest protector that disperses the force of a direct hit over the chest, mostly through extra padding.

Three are three giants in the baseball equipment market: Rawlings, Mizuno, and Wilson. Each offers different chest protectors using different materials, but none offer a protector explicitly aimed at preventing SCD. Their protectors rely on impact absorption, whereas the E-Team’s protector focuses on impact redistribution, with extra layering around the heart.

The E-Team consisted of five biomedical engineering undergraduates, a professor of biomedical engineering, a professor of architecture and design, a local entrepreneur, and a cardiologist (who initially brought the project to the team’s attention).

Breast Augmentation Instrument - BME 590 Technical Entrepreneurship

Stanford University - $9800.00

This E-Team from the University of Miami has designed an instrument that eases the insertion of implants when using the transaxillary breast augmentation procedure. The device works by holding the implant in an upright position. The first prototype is being made out of stainless steel. Eventually, the team wishes to test that prototype in surgery and, depending on the results, take it to mass production.

The team plans to make the prototype out of plastic, allowing the instrument to be disposable. If the design is successful, the team can use a thermo jet machine (FDM) to mass-produce the tool in a plastic form using three-dimensional drawings. This tool could promote surgeons to switch over to this newer procedure, thus promoting a much safer and efficient breast augmentation surgery.

Technical Entrepreneurship Portable Insulin Cooler

University of Nebraska-Lincoln - $21800.00

This grant supports the development of a prototype for a small, portable, battery-powered cooler for transporting heat- and cold-sensitive materials such as insulin for periods greater than forty-eight hours. The device will be cost competitive with existing coolers using cooler packs, and will offer greater temperature control, longer storage, and additional features, such as a syringe and blood sugar measuring equipment compartment. The market is projected to be 50 -100K units based on diabetic usage in the US. The E-Team is composed of five biomedical engineering students and faculty advisors from the department. The team is working with two companies that manufacture the key components of the device, a thermoelectric cooling system and moldable paraffin insulation.

Arthroscopic Simulator

North Carolina State University at Raleigh - $13500.00

This E-Team has developed a mechanical device which allows surgeons to practice various arthroscopic techniques on the knee, in order to develop better techniques and muscle memory. The device incorporates feedback mechanisms to allow for performance monitoring. It is portable, affordable, and easy to use

University of Miami, College of Engineering E-Team

University of Virginia-Main Campus - $14000.00

An E-Team course for juniors and seniors within the College of Engineering, the initial area of focus for this program is biomedical innovations that build on existing coursework. The course runs for two semesters, and successful E-Teams are encouraged to apply for Advanced E-Team funding in the second semester. Teams are supported to design and patent projects.

During the first semester the teams develop a business plan and attend weekly lectures on topics such as intellectual property, market analysis, budget development, and manufacturing. In the second semester, the teams meet biweekly to report progress and solve problems found during independent work. At the end of the second semester, they present a prototype and marketing plan. Support is available for teams that decide to continue their projects
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