Purdue University

Magneto team from U. Michigan wins 2011 BMEidea awards!

The Magneto: Magnetic Induction Internal Bleed Detector team from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, has earned first place and $10,000 in the sixth annual Biomedical Engineering Innovation, Design and Entrepreneurship competition!

The team’s device, the Magneto: Magnetic Induction Internal Bleed Detector (pictured), allows detection of internal bleeding complications after catheterization procedures through the femoral artery.

A team from Stanford University earned second place and $2,500 for Oculeve, a novel therapy that treats severe dry eye--a condition that affects 1.2 million people in the US--more effectively and less expensively than current treatments.

The Medtric Biotech team from Purdue University took third place and $1,000 for OSMOSE, a line of antimicrobial dressings for the prevention and treatment of infected wounds.

Read more about the winners and their projects. Congratulations!

 

 

LyoGo profile

Purdue University

In developing countries there is an extreme shortage of healthcare workers capable of giving injections safely and little infrastructure to transport liquid drugs that have to be refrigerated. As a result, 24 million cases of hepatitis, HIV, and other diseases are spread by unsafe needle practices each year, and five million children die because they live in reduced infrastructure villages with little or no refrigeration to keep vaccines or other medicines cold.

This team, called LyoGo, is developing a device that makes it easy to distribute, administer, and dispose of medicine around the world. LyoGo’s mixing technology stores a lyophilized (freeze-dried) drug and its liquid diluents in two chambers kept separate by a solid barrier. Due to the solid barrier, the injector reduces or eliminates the need for refrigeration of most compounds during transit or storage. Further, a safety shield locking design provides a self-contained sharps container that can be safely disposed of after use.

Learn more: http://www.lyogo.com/

back to complete list of Open Minds 2011 teams

Matrix NMR

Purdue University, 2001 - $16,000

Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is an analytical tool for analyzing the molecular structure of a sample, including chemicals such as drugs, peptides, aromatic molecules, pesticides, food additives, and others. NMR experiments analyze complex samples such as blood and urine and help determine chemical information. NMR sets the standard for the analysis of new chemicals because it obtains different information from each atom in a sample with a nucleus-specific system. Though useful, slow speeds and high costs make NMR not commercially viable for some industries.

To remedy these problems, this E-Team from Purdue, comprised of three analytical chemistry Ph.D. candidates and a graduate researcher in the Technology Transfer Initiative, aimed to offer customers an improved NMR probe that significantly reduces the cost and time needed to perform NMR analysis. Instead of testing each sample serially, this team's technology tested them simultaneously. In addition, the technology required a smaller sample size.

Griffin Analytical Technologies (GAT) MMS

Purdue University, 2000 - $15,500

Mass spectrometers are high-tech devices used to separate and analyze chemical substances at the molecular level, useful for a number of industries but especially defense and homeland security. The Griffin E-Team from Purdue developed an improved mass spectrometer that was smaller, cheaper, and better than existing systems. By using cylinders as the chemical analyzer, the device was made easy to miniaturize, thereby taking up less lab space, costing less, and making the device more sensitive and more accurate.

The team has gone on to successfully commercialize the technology, founding Griffin Analytical, Inc. and winning a number of grants and awards. As of 2007 the company has forty-five employees and is growing rapidly.

Griffin Analytical Technologies (GAT) MMS

Purdue University, 2001 - $15,500

Mass spectrometers are high-tech devices used to separate and analyze chemical substances at the molecular level, useful for a number of industries but especially defense and homeland security. The Griffin E-Team from Purdue developed an improved mass spectrometer that is smaller, cheaper, and better than older systems. By using cylinders as the chemical analyzer, the device was made easy to miniaturize, thereby taking up less lab space, costing less, and making the device more sensitive and more accurate.

The team has gone on to successfully commercialize the technology, founding Griffin Analytical, Inc. and winning a number of grants and awards. The company has forty-five employees and is growing rapidly.

TMT MicroSink

Purdue University, 2003 - $16,500

A large segment of popular consumer electronic devices (personal computers, cellular phones, personal digital assistants, etc.) have microprocessors acting as brains. These microprocessors consume a large amount of power and must be actively cooled in order to function reliably. The currently available heat sinking equipment needed to cool the electronics is bulky, inefficient, and costly. The TMT MicroSink E-Team developed low cost, high performance heat removal technology that blows air through a microscale heat sink without the use of moving parts, allowing large amounts of heat to be removed cheaply and efficiently. The new technology enables the development of chip-coolers that are considerably smaller, lighter, and quieter than currently available heat sink-fan combinations.

The E-Team included two doctoral students specializing in physics, mechanical engineering, and energy engineering. A faculty advisor with expertise in mechanical engineering supported the students along with two industry experts.

PICKLE Technology

Purdue University, 2004 - $17,700

This E-Team developed novel technology to generate modified root crops that produce significant quantities of vegetable oil. A cloned mutant gene named PICKLE (PKL) produces plants that accumulate large amounts of oil in their roots. The team believes radishes are promising candidates for hosting the gene because of their bigger roots, capable of storing large amounts of oil. They tested a variety of crops and established connections with the biofuels market.

Successful development of this technology would significantly expand the amount of crops that can produce commercially extractable vegetable oil. An increase in vegetable oil will be beneficial to several markets because it is a key ingredient in numerous products such as food for human consumption, biofuels, animal feed, plastics, and lubricants. The team has chosen to focus on vegetable oil to generate biofuels.

The licensing of genetically modified crops has blossomed into a multibillion dollar industry: seven million farmers in eighteen countries planted genetically modified crops in 2004.

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